Proportion of employed persons with managerial responsibilities, women, OECD

percent, 2011–2015

Info Edit
Country20112012201320142015
Brazil4.50
Costa Rica2.602.102.502.402.30
Indonesia1.001.001.00
Lithuania6.906.706.906.706.90
Russia6.90
South Africa5.706.30
Australia8.808.608.708.90
Austria3.002.902.703.102.90
Belgium4.705.805.505.905.80
Canada6.806.806.306.10
Chile1.201.401.701.701.20
Czech Republic2.803.103.403.303.70
Denmark1.601.101.101.201.40
Estonia6.605.906.507.307.60
Finland3.402.301.701.902.20
France6.206.105.104.704.60
Germany3.202.702.702.802.80
Greece2.402.703.502.601.90
Hungary5.004.204.204.204.20
Iceland7.508.408.807.507.60
Ireland5.305.505.605.906.10
Israel7.006.907.00
Italy2.402.302.402.402.40
Japan0.700.600.600.600.70
South Korea0.500.500.450.400.30
Latvia8.908.208.508.708.80
Luxembourg2.301.100.801.400.80
Mexico1.501.603.203.002.90
Netherlands4.704.303.703.803.50
Norway4.304.504.705.605.90
Poland5.205.305.405.405.50
Portugal4.404.704.905.304.40
Slovakia3.603.303.003.003.40
Slovenia6.906.706.406.806.40
Spain3.303.303.203.003.00
Sweden3.904.304.304.304.60
Switzerland5.705.905.806.206.60
Turkey2.502.502.402.302.30
United Kingdom7.607.707.807.908.10
United States14.2014.8014.60

This data looks at how many men and women are in paid work, who works full-time, and how having children and growing older affect women’s work patterns and earnings differently to men’s. It looks at how women bear the brunt of domestic and family responsibilities, even when working full-time. It also considers the benefits for businesses of keeping skilled women in the workplace, and encouraging them to sit on company boards. It looks at women’s representation in parliaments, judicial systems, and the senior civil service. It examines male and female employment in the wake of the crisis, and how women tend to be confined to the most vulnerable categories within the informal sector in developing countries.

Source: OECD