Neonatal tetanus

number of reported cases, 1974–2019

Info Edit
    1974 Ranking
    1. Philippines 2,658.00
    2. Sri Lanka 809.00
    3. Thailand 536.00
    4. Indonesia 523.00
    5. Angola 336.00
    6. Venezuela 227.00
    7. Malaysia 171.00
    8. Burma (Myanmar) 158.00
    9. South Africa 140.00
    10. Portugal 63.00
    11. Serbia 63.00
    12. Singapore 6.00
    13. Uruguay 2.00
    14. Fiji 1.00
    15. Israel 1.00
    16. Poland 1.00
    2019 Ranking
    1. Pakistan 432.00
    2. Mozambique 251.00
    3. Chad 237.00
    4. Yemen 142.00
    5. Nigeria 137.00
    6. Central African Republic 109.00
    7. Ethiopia 107.00
    8. Guinea 101.00
    9. Philippines 78.00
    10. China 73.00
    11. Bangladesh 49.00
    12. Madagascar 46.00
    13. Liberia 39.00
    14. India 35.00
    15. Vietnam 35.00
    16. Sudan 33.00
    17. Malaysia 30.00
    18. Zambia 26.00
    19. Burma (Myanmar) 25.00
    20. Italy 21.00
    21. Afghanistan 20.00
    22. Mali 17.00
    23. Indonesia 17.00
    24. Benin 14.00
    25. Cambodia 14.00
    26. Togo 13.00
    27. Uganda 11.00
    28. Ghana 8.00
    29. Papua New Guinea 8.00
    30. Cameroon 7.00
    31. Niger 6.00
    32. Congo (Kinshasa) 6.00
    33. Haiti 5.00
    34. Laos 5.00
    35. Iraq 4.00
    36. Gabon 4.00
    37. Sierra Leone 3.00
    38. Nepal 3.00
    39. Peru 3.00
    40. Honduras 2.00
    41. Malawi 2.00
    42. Colombia 2.00
    43. Syria 2.00
    44. Gambia 1.00
    45. Albania 1.00
    46. Thailand 1.00
    47. Mexico 1.00
    48. Equatorial Guinea 1.00
    49. Senegal 1.00
    50. Dominican Republic 1.00
    51. Comoros 1.00
    52. Ivory Coast 1.00
    53. Namibia 1.00
    54. Egypt 1.00
    55. Rwanda 1.00

    Tetanus is a disease that is acquired when the spores of the bacterium Clostridium Tetani infect a wound or the umbilical stump. Spores are universally present in the soil. People of all ages can get tetanus but the disease is particularly common and serious in newborn babies (“neonatal tetanus”). It requires treatment in a medical facility, often in a referral hospital. Neonatal tetanus, which is mostly fatal, is particularly common in rural areas where deliveries are at home without adequate sterile procedures.

    Source: World Health Organization