Household disposable income annual net growth rate

percent, 1970–2017

Info Edit
    1970 Ranking
    1. United States 4,108.26
    2. France 2,828.37
    3. Australia 5.30
    2017 Ranking
    1. Luxembourg 44,446.37
    2. Australia 39,935.96
    3. Germany 38,995.54
    4. Austria 36,166.19
    5. Belgium 33,946.48
    6. Netherlands 33,578.20
    7. Sweden 33,378.19
    8. Denmark 33,335.32
    9. Finland 32,851.89
    10. Canada 32,766.31
    11. United Kingdom 32,039.32
    12. Italy 29,722.16
    13. Ireland 27,959.97
    14. Spain 26,108.83
    15. Czech Republic 24,440.63
    16. Slovenia 24,243.89
    17. South Korea 24,116.42
    18. Lithuania 23,895.99
    19. Slovakia 22,508.76
    20. Estonia 21,779.63
    21. Greece 19,918.68
    22. Hungary 19,218.60
    23. Latvia 18,971.31
    24. South Africa 9,485.61
    25. Portugal 2.56
    26. Norway 1.77
    27. France 1.40

    Real household net disposable income is defined as the sum of household final consumption expenditure and savings, minus the change in net equity of households in pension funds. This indicator also corresponds to the sum of wages and salaries, mixed income, net property income, net current transfers and social benefits other than social transfers in kind, less taxes on income and wealth and social security contributions paid by employees, the self-employed and the unemployed. Household gross adjusted disposable income additionally reallocates “income” from government and non-profit institutions serving households (NPISHs) to households to reflect social transfers in kind. These transfers reflect expenditures made by government or NPISHs on individual goods and services, such as health and education, on behalf of an individual household. The indicator includes the disposable income of non-profit institutions serving households.

    Source: OECD