Employed males that are self-employed

percent, 1955–2016

Info Edit
    1955 Ranking
    1. Japan 56.53
    2. United States 18.03
    2016 Ranking
    1. Colombia 51.33
    2. Greece 34.09
    3. Turkey 32.45
    4. Mexico 31.54
    5. Chile 26.47
    6. South Korea 25.50
    7. Italy 23.94
    8. Poland 20.72
    9. New Zealand 17.88
    10. Portugal 17.76
    11. Czech Republic 17.16
    12. Spain 16.94
    13. Ireland 16.86
    14. Netherlands 16.81
    15. United Kingdom 15.43
    16. Switzerland 15.06
    17. Belgium 14.84
    18. Slovenia 14.19
    19. Finland 14.03
    20. Israel 12.77
    21. Austria 12.72
    22. France 11.81
    23. Hungary 10.74
    24. Japan 10.56
    25. Germany 10.43
    26. Australia 10.08
    27. Sweden 9.99
    28. Denmark 9.06
    29. Canada 8.58
    30. Russia 7.49
    31. Norway 6.96
    32. United States 6.40

    Self-employment is defined as the employment of employers, workers who work for themselves, members of producers’ co- operatives, and unpaid family workers. The latter are unpaid in the sense that they lack a formal contract to receive a fixed amount of income at regular intervals, but they share in the income generated by the enterprise. Unpaid family workers are particularly important in farming and retail trade. All persons who work in corporate enterprises, including company directors, are considered to be employees. Employed people are as those aged 15 or over who report that they have worked in gainful employment for at least one hour in the previous week or who had a job but were absent from work during the reference week. This indicator is measured as a percentage of the employed population considered (total, men or women).

    Source: OECD