Civilian battle-related deaths

number, 1989–2016

Info Edit
    1989 Ranking
    1. Ethiopia 24,358.00
    2. Afghanistan 5,174.00
    3. El Salvador 4,925.00
    4. Sudan 4,515.00
    5. Angola 2,810.00
    6. Peru 1,827.00
    7. Mozambique 1,149.00
    8. Uganda 1,022.00
    9. India 1,002.00
    10. Burma (Myanmar) 997.00
    11. Philippines 937.00
    12. Panama 920.00
    13. Cambodia 814.00
    14. Lebanon 760.00
    15. Sri Lanka 533.00
    16. Nicaragua 526.00
    17. Somalia 373.00
    18. Romania 249.00
    19. Colombia 238.00
    20. Turkey 227.00
    21. Morocco 207.00
    22. Thailand 201.00
    23. Paraguay 150.00
    24. Guatemala 82.00
    25. Chad 50.00
    26. Iraq 50.00
    27. Haiti 48.00
    28. United Kingdom 34.00
    29. Laos 30.00
    30. Comoros 29.00
    31. Liberia 27.00
    32. Bangladesh 26.00
    33. Djibouti 6.00
    34. Israel 5.00
    35. Germany 3.00
    2016 Ranking
    1. Syria 44,303.00
    2. Afghanistan 17,980.00
    3. Iraq 9,016.00
    4. Nigeria 2,430.00
    5. Yemen 2,426.00
    6. Somalia 1,925.00
    7. Libya 1,727.00
    8. Turkey 1,398.00
    9. Sudan 1,314.00
    10. Pakistan 761.00
    11. South Sudan 710.00
    12. India 652.00
    13. Philippines 414.00
    14. Niger 274.00
    15. Egypt 268.00
    16. Congo (Kinshasa) 261.00
    17. Ukraine 255.00
    18. Cameroon 181.00
    19. Azerbaijan 137.00
    20. Burma (Myanmar) 116.00
    21. Saudi Arabia 110.00
    22. Mali 96.00
    23. Algeria 86.00
    24. Russia 66.00
    25. Congo (Brazzaville) 51.00
    26. Ethiopia 50.00
    27. Thailand 50.00
    28. Kenya 49.00
    29. Bangladesh 39.00
    30. Jordan 34.00
    31. Colombia 30.00
    32. Mozambique 26.00
    33. Eritrea 25.00
    34. Armenia 4.00
    35. Belgium 2.00

    Battle-related deaths are deaths in battle-related conflicts between warring parties in the conflict dyad (two units that are parties to a conflict). Typically, battle-related deaths occur in warfare involving the armed forces of the warring parties. This includes traditional battlefield fighting, guerrilla activities, and all kinds of bombardments of military units, cities, villages, and so forth. The targets are usually the military itself and its installations or state institutions and state. Civilians in UCDP data are unarmed people who are not active members of the security forces of the state, or members of an organized armed militia or opposition group. Government officials, such as members of parliament, governors, and councilors, are also excluded and are instead seen as representatives of the government of a state.

    Source: Uppsala Conflict Data Program